Plenary Speakers

  • Andrea Goldsmith
    Dean of Engineering and Applied Science and the Arthur LeGrand Doty Professor of Electrical Engineering at Princeton University
    Andrea Goldsmith
  • Richard G. Baraniuk
    C. Sidney Burrus Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Rice University and the Founding Director of OpenStax
    Richard G. Baraniuk
  • Michael I. Jordan
    Pehong Chen Distinguished Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and the Department of Statistics at the University of California, Berkeley
    Michael I. Jordan
  • Christos Harilaos Papadimitriou
    Donovan Family Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University
    Christos Harilaos Papadimitriou

Andrea Goldsmith

Dean of Engineering and Applied Science and the Arthur LeGrand Doty Professor of Electrical Engineering at Princeton University

Andrea Goldsmith is the Dean of Engineering and Applied Science and the Arthur LeGrand Doty Professor of Electrical Engineering at Princeton University. She was previously the Stephen Harris Professor of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University, where she is now Harris Professor Emerita. Her research interests are in information theory, communication theory, and signal processing, and their application to wireless communications, interconnected systems, and neuroscience. She founded and served as Chief Technical Officer of Plume WiFi (formerly Accelera, Inc.) and of Quantenna (QTNA), Inc, and she serves on the Board of Directors for Intel (INTC), Medtronic (MDT), Crown Castle Inc (CCI), and the Marconi Society. She also serves on the Presidential Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) and as the founding Chair of the IEEE Board of Directors Committee on Diversity, Inclusion, and Equity. Dr. Goldsmith is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the Royal Academy of Engineering, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Her awards include the Marconi Prize, the IEEE Sumner Technical Field Award, the ACM Athena Lecturer Award, the ComSoc Armstrong Technical Achievement Award, the Kirchmayer Graduate Teaching Award, the WICE Mentoring Award, and the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal’s Women of Influence Award. She is author of the book “Wireless Communications” and co-author of the books “MIMO Wireless Communications,” “Principles of Cognitive Radio,” and “Machine Learning and Wireless Communications,” all published by Cambridge University Press, as well as an inventor on 29 patents.

Richard G. Baraniuk

C. Sidney Burrus Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Rice University and the Founding Director of OpenStax

Richard G. Baraniuk is the C. Sidney Burrus Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Rice University and the Founding Director of OpenStax. His research interests lie in new theory, algorithms, and hardware for sensing, signal processing, machine learning, and education. He is member of the US National Academy of Engineering and American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a fellow of the US National Academy of Inventors, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and IEEE. He has received the US DOD Vannevar Bush Faculty Fellow Award (National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellow), the IEEE Signal Processing Society Norbert Wiener Society Award and Claude Shannon-Harry Nyquist Technical Achievement Award, the Harold W. McGraw, Jr. Prize in Education, and the IEEE James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal, among others

Michael I. Jordan

Pehong Chen Distinguished Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and the Department of Statistics at the University of California, Berkeley

Michael I. Jordan is the Pehong Chen Distinguished Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and the Department of Statistics at the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests bridge the computational, statistical, cognitive, biological and social sciences. Prof. Jordan is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a Foreign Member of the Royal Society. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He was a Plenary Lecturer at the International Congress of Mathematicians in 2018. He received the Ulf Grenander Prize from the American Mathematical Society in 2021, the IEEE John von Neumann Medal in 2020, the IJCAI Research Excellence Award in 2016, the David E. Rumelhart Prize in 2015, and the ACM/AAAI Allen Newell Award in 2009.
He gave the Inaugural IMS Grace Wahba Lecture in 2022, the IMS Neyman Lecture in 2011, and an IMS Medallion Lecture in 2004.

Christos Harilaos Papadimitriou

Donovan Family Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University

Christos Harilaos Papadimitriou is the Donovan Family Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University. Before joining Columbia in 2017, he was a professor at UC Berkeley for the previous 22 years, and before that he taught at Harvard, MIT, NTU Athens, Stanford, and UCSD. He has written five textbooks and many articles on algorithms and complexity, and their applications to optimization, databases, control, AI, robotics, economics and game theory, the Internet, evolution, and the brain. He holds a PhD from Princeton (1976), and eight honorary doctorates, including from ETH, University of Athens, EPFL, and Univ. de Paris Dauphine. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences of the US, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the National Academy of Engineering, and he has received the Knuth prize, the Gödel prize, the von Neumann medal, the EATCS award, the Babbage award, the 2022 Pioneer award in honor of the women of ENIAC by the IEEE Computer Society, as well as the 2018 Harvey Prize by Technion. In 2015 the president of the Hellenic Republic named him commander of the order of the Phoenix. He has also written three novels: “Turing”, “Logicomix” and his latest “Independence.”